Antisemitism and Islamophobia in Europe

Antisemitism and Islamophobia in Europe

A Shared Story?

Editors: Renton, James, Gidley, Ben (Eds.)

  • Uncovers the connection and separation of antisemitism and Islamophobia in Europe
  • Opens a new field which considers Jewish, Muslim, and others’ responses to the two related racisms
  • Includes studies of Russia, the Balkans, Germany, France, Iberia, the Netherlands, and the UK

About this book

    This is the first book to examine the relationship between European antisemitism and Islamophobia from the Crusades until the twenty-first century in the principal flashpoints of the two racisms. With case studies ranging from the Balkans to the UK, the contributors take the debate away from politicised polemics about whether or not Muslims are the new Jews. Much previous scholarship and public discussion has focused on comparing European ideas about Jews and Judaism in the past with contemporary attitudes towards Muslims and Islam. This volume rejects this approach. Instead, it interrogates how the dynamic relationship between antisemitism and Islamophobia has evolved over time and space. The result is the uncovering of a previously unknown story in which European ideas about Jews and Muslims were indeed connected, but were also ripped apart. Religion, empire, nation-building, and war, all played their part in the complex evolution of this relationship.  As well as a study of prejudice, this book also opens up a new area of inquiry: how Muslims, Jews, and others have responded to these historically connected racisms.

The volume brings together leading scholars in the emerging field of antisemitism-Islamophobia studies who work in a diverse range of disciplines: anthropology, history, sociology, critical theory, and literature. Together, they help us to understand a Europe in which Jews and Arabs were once called Semites, and today are widely thought to be on two different sides of the War on Terror.

Endorsement

This is the first book to examine the relationship between European antisemitism and Islamophobia from the Crusades until the twenty-first century in the principal flashpoints of the two racisms. With case studies ranging from the Balkans to the UK, the contributors take the debate away from politicised polemics about whether or not Muslims are the new Jews. Much previous scholarship and public discussion has focused on comparing European ideas about Jews and Judaism in the past with contemporary attitudes towards Muslims and Islam. This volume rejects this approach. Instead, it interrogates how the dynamic relationship between antisemitism and Islamophobia has evolved over time and space. The result is the uncovering of a previously unknown story in which European ideas about Jews and Muslims were indeed connected, but were also ripped apart. Religion, empire, nation-building, and war, all played their part in the complex evolution of this relationship.  As well as a study of prejudice, this book also opens up a new area of inquiry: how Muslims, Jews, and others have responded to these historically connected racisms.

The volume brings together leading scholars in the emerging field of antisemitism-Islamophobia studies who work in a diverse range of disciplines: anthropology, history, sociology, critical theory, and literature. Together, they help us to understand a Europe in which Jews and Arabs were once called Semites, and today are widely thought to be on two different sides of the War on Terror.

‘This is an important intervention in a contentious subject area. The collection, uniquely, opens up the study of antisemitism and Islamophobia across time and space. Made up of leading scholars, it makes an undisputed case for considering comparative racism as relational. It is essential reading for anyone interested in this growing field.’

―Bryan Cheyette, author. Diasporas of the Mind: Jewish/Postcolonial Writing and the Nightmare of History (2014)

 

About this book

This is the first book to examine the relationship between European antisemitism and Islamophobia from the Crusades until the twenty-first century in the principal flashpoints of the two racisms. With case studies ranging from the Balkans to the UK, the contributors take the debate away from politicised polemics about whether or not Muslims are the new Jews. Much previous scholarship and public discussion has focused on comparing European ideas about Jews and Judaism in the past with contemporary attitudes towards Muslims and Islam. This volume rejects this approach. Instead, it interrogates how the dynamic relationship between antisemitism and Islamophobia has evolved over time and space. The result is the uncovering of a previously unknown story in which European ideas about Jews and Muslims were indeed connected, but were also ripped apart. Religion, empire, nation-building, and war, all played their part in the complex evolution of this relationship.  As well as a study of prejudice, this book also opens up a new area of inquiry: how Muslims, Jews, and others have responded to these historically connected racisms.

The volume brings together leading scholars in the emerging field of antisemitism-Islamophobia studies who work in a diverse range of disciplines: anthropology, history, sociology, critical theory, and literature. Together, they help us to understand a Europe in which Jews and Arabs were once called Semites, and today are widely thought to be on two different sides of the War on Terror.

About the authors

James Renton is Reader in History at Edge Hill University, UK. His research focuses on racism, empire, and the genealogy of global politics. He is the author of The Zionist Masquerade: The Birth of the Anglo-Zionist Alliance, 1914-1918 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007).

Ben Gidley is Senior Lecturer in the School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy at Birkbeck, University of London, UK. His research focuses on racisms, multiculture, diaspora, and urban diversity. He is the co-author of Turbulent Times: The British Jewish Community Today (2010).

eBook ISBN978-1-137-41302-4

DOI10.1057/978-1-137-41302-4

Softcover ISBN978-1-137-41299-7

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Table of contents (11 chapters)

  1. Front Matter

    Pages i-xiii

  2. No Access

    Chapter

    Pages 1-21

    Introduction: The Shared Story of Europe’s Ideas of the Muslim and the Jew—A Diachronic Framework

  3. Christendom

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 23-23

    2. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 25-49

      Ethnic and Religious Categories in the Treatment of Jews and Muslims in the Crusader States

    3. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 51-75

      Antisemitism, Islamophobia and the Conspiracy Theory of Medical Murder in Early Modern Spain and Portugal

  4. Empire

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 77-77

    2. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 79-98

      Fear and Loathing in the Russian Empire

    3. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 99-140

      The End of the Semites

  5. Divergence

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 141-141

    2. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 143-164

      The Case of Circumcision: Diaspora Judaism as a Model for Islam?

    3. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 165-185

      Islamophobia and Antisemitism in the Balkans

    4. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 187-214

      Antisemitism and Its Critics

  6. Response

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 215-215

    2. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 217-266

      Antisemitism, Islamophobia and the Search for Common Ground in French Antiracist Movements since 1898

    3. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 267-281

      The Price of an Entrance Ticket to Western Society: Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Heinrich Heine and the Double Standard of Emancipation

    4. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 283-301

      The Impact of Antisemitism and Islamophobia on Jewish–Muslim Relations in the UK: Memory, Experience, Context

  7. Back Matter

    Pages 303-311

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