Category Archives: Photography

Migrant Metropolis

When:  14 Sep 2016 – 18:3020:30

Where:

Autograph ABP – Rivington Place, London, EC2A 3BA

An evening of film, photography, radio, theatre and debate on how the movement of people is shaping our city. 

Organised by Migrants Right Network.

Stories of arrival, belonging, struggle and longing that prompt us to reflect on what it takes to be an open and inclusive city, told by some of our favourite artists, writers and activists.

With the participation of:

  • Alia Syed, experimental filmmaker and artist. Alia’s work proposes an ongoing investigation of the nature and role of language in intercultural communication, with a focus on borders and boundaries, translation and the trans-cultured self.
  • Kavita Puri, Editor, BBC Our World. Presenter of BBC Radio 4’s award-winning series Three Pounds in My Pocket, that tells the stories of the pioneering migrants who came to Britain from the Indian subcontinent in the 1950s and 1960s.
  • Anthony Lam, a photographic artist whose work examines and explores notions and (un)realities of boundaries and borders.
  • Rebecca Omonira-Oyekanmi, reporter and writer that exposes the impact of government policy on ordinary lives. Writer in residence Lacuna Magazine, shortlisted for the George Orwell Prize for Politcal Writing 2012 & 2015.
  • Amina Gichinga, Music educator and community activist with Take Back the City, former City & East London Assembly Take Back our City candidate.
  • Ben Gidley, Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychosocial Studies, University of Birbeck. Ben’s ethnographic research focuses on the question of how we live together with difference in urban settings.
  •  Inua Ellams,  award winning poet, playwright and performer. Identity, displacement and destiny are recurring themes in his work.

There will be a drinks reception after the event to continue the conversation.

FREE. Register here

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For Pete Pope

The past weekend marked a year since the passing of my friend Pete Pope, community activist, custodian of local memory, merry prankster, cyclist, leaflet distributor,  ale-quaffer, kind soul, and free man of the parish of Deptford. Pete was one of the first people I interviewed when I started out as a researcher at the Centre for Urban and Community Research at Goldsmiths, as part of the Creekside regeneration programme evaluation. I’ve spent hours interviewing him, most often in his regular haunt the Dog and Bell, where the half the interview below also took place. He was incredibly kind and generous with me, and I know he was to many others too. I miss him. 

Here are some edited extracts from the transcript of an interview with Pete which I conducted on the Pepys Foreshore and in the Dog and Bell on 16th March 2004 as part of Cacao’s Pepys Portrait Project, a life story/portrait project conceived by Simon Rowe and Francesca Sanlorenzo, from which the photo (by Simon) also comes.

Pete Pope, by Simon Rowe and Francesca Sanlorenzo

“I grew up down Surrey.  I grew up in Farnham in Surrey.  But I knew from an early age that the only way to get on in Farnham was to get out of Farnham, you know.  And the kind of social world is split into two camps, which became the stayers and the goers, as it turned out, so I sorted that one out very quickly.

I came to Deptford in ’82. Okay I’d been at Rose Bruford Drama College in Sidcup. I was living in Kilburn. I was living in private rented accommodation and the landlord just decided to double the rent.  “No way, no!” And because I had been to Rose Bruford, it had the kind of student grapevine basically. And through the grapevine I discovered that Pepys Estate, which at that time was a GLC estate, was officially classified as hard to let, and you just have to go to the GLC office down on the Old Kent Road and say crudely I want to get a flat and I’ll take Pepys, and you get “Oh yes, great fantastic, bless you”.  So that was it and at a fraction of the rent.

I had to have a low rise because, as much as I’m fascinated by the geography and love views, I’ve actually got no head for heights on a long-term basis.  If I was up at the top of a tower and I woke up one morning with a hangover and the wind was blowing, I’d just be walking over the ceiling howling, you know.  So I got myself a second floor flat and that was it: I’m stuck there. Continue reading


New Lives and Dreams

The results of the 2012 COMPAS photo competition, with the theme of “new lives and dreams”, have been published. I like some of the runners up best:

Shortlisted, Paolo Cardullo, Untitled

Another photograph, by Paolo Cardullo, explains that the image “engages with the unusual (for Italy) syncretisation of food, where local producers of flour OO, typically and proudly used for pasta, re-brand this as ‘Chapati Flour’, for the use of the emergent Punjabi group in that region.”

Shortlisted, Roger Norum, A lone cyclist pedals across the border from India into Nepal at sunset

Shortlisted, Rob Boler, Open All Hours


An Economy Built on Trust and Goodwill

Eastleigh, Nairobi’s commercial hub: Photo essay by Neil Carrier, on the Oxford Diaspora Programme website

Photo Credit: Neil Carrier

Here.


A review of Another London

Here’s a review of the Another London show, quoting from our catalogue essay.


Girl with Cassette Recorder (1975)

At History is Made at Night:

This great photograph of a young woman with her cassette recorder was taken in London in 1975 by US photographer Al Vandenberg. It features in the exhibition Another London: International Photographers Capture City Life 1930-1980 , currently on at Tate Britain in London.

Pepys Portrait Project

From Cacao’s tumblr:

Pepys Portrait Project London, 2004 - Present

Pepys Portrait Project

London, 2004 – Present

HIGH-RES 1/12/12 — 7:22pm SHORT URL: http://tmblr.co/ZihICxEfi7ug FILED UNDER: #Pepys Portrait Project

Pepys Portrait Project

Pepys Estate was built in 1965, a modernist high rise GLC estate, seen as one of the best housing estates in London. The estate symbolised the utopian dream of a better future for working people. Since then, the reputation of council housing has changed, and tower blocks are associated with social problems.

The population has become more diverse. As part of the regeneration of the estate, some blocks have been demolished and their residents rehoused; others have been sold to private developers for luxury homes.

Since 2004, Cacao has been documenting the lives of the people in the estate, revealing the different worlds behind their doors and windows. From photographs of residents and their homes, we have built a portrait of a changing estate. The project interweaves the images with their stories, a diary documenting an account of the social life of the estate over the four decades of its life. Through these images and voices, the residents express universal truths, hopes, dreams and fears.

In 2007 Simon Rowe continued the photographic exploration of the Estate as part of a personal project Local Authority. (www.simonrowe.co)

See also:

 ‘What’s so great about SE8’? Continue reading


Photography and The Practice of Walking

At OpenVizor, a nice video with me talking about photography and the practice of walking, in connection with an Urban Encounters event last year.