Tag Archives: Turbulent Times

Impact case study: Oxford research on integration and diversity

As this is now published on the REF2014 website, I have pasted here the impact case study submitted by Oxford’s Anthropology department to the Research Excellence Framework, which included my work alongside that of colleagues. [See licensing terms of use here. For related blogposts, going into detail about much of this research, see here.]  Continue reading

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Review of Turbulent Times by Geoffrey Alderman

Review of Turbulent Times: the British Jewish community today by 

in Journal of Modern Jewish Studies  Volume 12, 2013 Issue 2 Pages 367-368 | Published online: 11 Nov 2013

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Review of Turbulent Times by Heather Miller Rubens

Review of: Kahn-Harris, Keith, and Gidley, BenTurbulent Times: The British Jewish Community Today. London: Continuum International, 2010. 237 pp. $34.95 (paper) by Heather Miller Rubens (Institute for Christian and Jewish Studies) in The Journal of Religion Volume 93, Number 2 | April 2013

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Contemporary Anglo-Jewish community leadership: coping with multiculturalism

The British Journal of SociologyNew article published in British Journal of Sociology:

Contemporary Anglo-Jewish community leadership: coping with multiculturalism, Ben Gidley, Keith Kahn-Harris.

Article first published online: 8 MAR 2012. DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-4446.2011.01398.x. Volume 63,  Issue 1, pages 168–187, March 2012

Abstract: In this article, drawing on qualitative interviews and documentary analysis, we argue that the Jewish community in Britain has undergone a fundamental shift since 1990 from a ‘strategy of security’, a strategy of communal leadership based on emphasizing the secure British citizenship and belonging of the UK’s Jews, to a ‘strategy of insecurity’, where the communal leadership instead stresses an excess of security among Anglo-Jewry. We demonstrate this based on two case studies: of the Jewish renewal movement in the 1990s and the ‘new antisemitism’ phenomenon of the 2000s. We conclude that this shift is tied to the shift from a monocultural Britain to an officially multicultural one, and that therefore there are lessons that can be taken from it for the study of British and other multiculturalisms. Continue reading